A bit about the ASP.NET AJAX 1.0 Beta

October 21, 2006

I was so excited about the release of ASP.NET AJAX 1.0 Beta, that I couldn’t wait till I got my hands on it. Here’s some quick notes about my experience so far.

1. The release is now made in three parts. One is the core Framework with only some of the features/controls (Script Manager, Update Panel and Timer 😦 ) but with full support from Microsoft. The rest of the controls from the previous release is now coming in a “value add” pack and finally the all-cool Ajax Control Toolkit.

2. A new template is now made available in the main VS Template set as ASP.NET AJAX enabled website (what a promotion). There’s anyway some work involved if you are migrating your existing ASP.NET AJAX apps.
Here’s a quicky:

  • Uninstall existing Atlas installations. 
  • Remove / Replace the existing Microsoft.Web.Atlas.dll from the bin folder and add the new assembly (which is now also in the GAC).
  • Add the other new DLLs (from the Value added pack and new AJAXControlToolkit) if you are using those features.
  • Make the required changes in the web.config (core and extra)
  • Do a find/replace to all <atlas:….> server controls to make it <asp:…>
  • Some other individual tweaks to the controls/properties that could be found in the migration document.

3. Technically AJAX enabled web pages now load faster than ever since the team has strategically down sized and separated the javascript file (into miniature parts) that was earlier downloaded fully to the browser. Tested compatibility for Safari is now available and very soon Opera will also get see the power of ASP.NET AJAX. More info: at Scott’s Blog.

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ASP.NET AJAX 1.0 Beta Released

October 21, 2006

So the much awaited “ASP.NET AJAX” (formerly known as Atlas) was released a little while ago as ASP.NET AJAX 1.0 Beta. Hooray!

Here’s a quick guide on the Changes between the ASP.NET AJAX (“Atlas”) CTP and this Release and also the very important Migration Guide to convert CTP Built apps into v1.0 Beta.

Whats keeping you waiting. Dive in! More updates to come soon!


Nikhil’s presentation on ASP.NET AJAX at the JAOO Conference

October 13, 2006

Here’s the link (just in case you dont see the Download button in Channel9) to the screencast of Nikhil’s latest presentation on ASP.NET AJAX at the  JAOO 2006 conference in Denmark. Its interesting to hear about his dialogs with Ed Burns from Sun, who works on JSF and Bruce Johnson from Google, who is responsible for the GWT.

http://channel9.msdn.com/Screencasts/243775_JAOOLapAroundAtlas.wmv

BTW, JAOO stands for Java and Object-Oriented Software Engineering. But it was nice to include .NET also into the scene.


Google destroys Security Through Obscurity ?

October 13, 2006

I dont know why, I wasn’t too thrilled about “Google Labs’ Code Search” anyway, even though it seemed to be a bright idea. But check out this article (I received from Chandima, who got it from Buddini. Thanks people!) which raises some concerns regarding using this so called “cool thingi” on Builder.au titled “Google destroys Security Through Obscurity“.


AJAX made peanuts with ASP.NET Atlas

October 5, 2006

It was a very short session yesterday when I presented the quick move into “ASP.NET Atlas” now “ASP.NET AJAX” at the Sri Lanka .NET User Group Meeting. Another packed house, with people standing out to get a glimpse of the 2 scheduled sessions. Merill’s “Introduction to .NET 3.0” was a great (and long 🙂 session, cutting my allocated time down drastically. As I said it is tough to controll the enthusiasm when we present on new and exciting technology.

My session titled “ASP.NET Atlas : AJAX made peanuts” is easily a 2 hour presentation, I prepared for the Microsoft Sri Lanka’s ISV (Independant Software Vendors) session, which I did last week. But with only 15 minutes left yesterday, all I could do was quickly introduce and show how to transform existing ASP.NET applications to enable AJAX functions, with the aim of “not dissapointing” those who came to know all about Atlas. Anyway, my full session was carried forward for the next meeting by demand.